Tag Archives: NYU Langone

NYU Langone Health Event @Staten Island Yankees — Concussions: What You Need to Know

concussions

Join experts from NYU Langone Health’s Concussion Center for a discussion to better understand player risks and how to manage a concussion.

DON’T MISS YOUR CHANCE TO BE PART OF THE FUN WITH THE STATEN ISLAND YANKEES!

Sunday, July 28th @ 1:00PM Staten Island Yankees vs Lowell Spinners (Boston Red Sox Affiliate) Richmond County Bank Ballpark at St. George

Purchase a Skyline Suite ticket for $45. Your purchase includes:

  • Skyline Suite access. The Skyline Suite is located on the first base side of the ballpark on the suite level
  • 90 minutes of food service
  • FREE health event: Concussions: What You Need to Know

The ballpark gates will be open at 12:00PM. No outside food or beverage is allowed in the ballpark. Guests 2 and under do not require a ticket to get into the ballpark.

12:30 pm: Concussions: What You Need to Know. NYU Langone’s Concussion Center experts will discuss recognition, management and prevention.

For more information and to purchase tickets please contact: Jesse Lopresti at 718-313-1324 or jlopresti@siyanks.com

 

Concussions On or Off the Playing Field: What Parents Need to Know

Hassenfield Children's Hospital

From the real experts at Hassenfield Children’s Hospital at NYU Langone:

A concussion is an injury to the brain caused by sudden head movement – from either a jolt or blow to the head or body. While many people think of football and other contact sports as the most common cause of concussion, playgrounds and bicycling or scooters are the leading cause of concussion in children. It is critical that children play safely and that kids, parents, and guardians know how to spot the signs and symptoms of concussion. Symptoms from a concussion can take minutes or hours to develop, so if a concussion is suspected, it is important to book an appointment with a doctor trained in concussion management for a thorough evaluation after a blow to the head or body. Concussions typically resolve on their own within a month of injury, but recovery is faster for children who see a specialist right away.

A few simple precautions can help keep you and your children safe:

  • Use age-appropriate playground and cycling equipment
  • Ensure that equipment is properly maintained for safety
  • Use guardrails to prevent falls
  • Wear a helmet when bicycling, skateboarding, or using a scooter
  • Look out for hazards that can cause trips or falls
  • Talk with kids about the importance of playing by the rules to avoid unintentional injury

Concussion identification:

Signs or symptoms of concussion may include:

  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Balance problems
  • Nausea
  • Mood changes
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Difficulty concentrating or remembering
  • Sensitivity to light or noise

You should immediately seek medical help or call 911 if there are signs of:

  • Loss of consciousness
  • Severe or worsening symptoms
  • Sudden changes in speech or walking
  • Bruising around the eyes or behind the ear
  • Facial deformity
  • Vision changes

 Recovery:

Children can begin to return to their normal, non-contact, non-strenuous activities a few days after suffering a concussion as long as their symptoms do not increase with activity. Promoting good sleep and nutrition can help the child feel better. The child can also gradually return to school as tolerated under guidance from a physician, so communication with school administration is important. Children should not return to sports or strenuous physical activities until they are in school full-time and have been cleared by their physician.

 

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Elizabeth Barchi, MD, is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery and sports medicine specialist at NYU Langone Health. She sees children and adults at NYU Langone Orthopedic Hospital and the Joan H. and Preston Robert Tisch Center at Essex Crossing, and her main interests include injury prevention, cross-training, nutrition and energy availability, and optimizing recovery.

Vascular Birthmarks in Babies: What Parents Need to Know Part 2 of 2

Vascular birthmark

From the real experts at Hassenfield Children’s Hospital at NYU Langone:

Last time, we learned about the most common type of vascular birthmark in babies, the infantile hemangioma. Read on to learn more about the other most common vascular birthmark in babies, capillary malformations.

Capillary Malformations

Capillary malformations are another very common vascular birthmark. More commonly called “port wine stains,” “angel’s kiss,” or “salmon spots,” they are the result of dilated capillary connections close to the surface of the skin. Unlike infantile hemangiomas, these vascular birthmarks are almost always clearly visible at birth. They start off pink, red, or salmon-colored, flat and flush with the skin, and usually stay flat for years. They are painless and do not bleed, and they do not follow their own growth cycle like infantile hemangiomas do. Depending on the type, they either fade early on, or grow with the patient and remain present for life.

When capillary malformations are located along the middle of a baby’s body, they are called medial capillary malformations. On the face, they appear in the middle of the forehead, and point downwards in a V shape that ends with the point of the V around the tip of the nose. The sides of the V can cross the skin of the eyelids. On the back of the neck, they spread from the bottom of the hairline to the upper neck. They can also be located at the base of the spine. While common, medial capillary malformations usually fade on their own by two to three years of age, and generally do not require treatment.

Capillary malformations that are closer to the sides of the body are less likely to disappear without treatment. If these more lateral birthmarks are left alone, they can continue to darken and begin to grow thicker. They tend to turn a rich purple color, and will go from flat and smooth, to raised, with areas that feel like nodules under the skin. When they get to this point, they become much more difficult to treat.

Which Capillary Malformations Need Treatment?

In general, if a capillary malformation appears to be growing or darkening, it should be evaluated by a specialist. This is not only because there can be cosmetic consequences to leaving it alone, but also because, similar to infantile hemangiomas, capillary malformations can be external signs of internal issues. If this is the case, your doctor may order an MRI to check your baby’s internal organs. In particular, the brain and eyes may need to be examined if there are extensive capillary malformations over the face.

In very rare cases, a capillary malformation birthmark can also be an early sign of more serious health issues that are not obvious until late childhood. Because of this, babies with capillary malformations that are not in the middle of the body and/or do not fade after birth should be followed by a vascular anomalies specialist.

Laser therapy is the mainstay of treatment for capillary malformations. If laser therapy is chosen for your baby, the treatments will be spaced out to allow time for healing in between sessions. Your doctor might also prescribe a cream that helps to shrink the blood vessels close to the skin’s surface, which helps to make the effects of laser treatment longer lasting. This cream is also available without laser therapy, but is more effective when combined.

Take Home Message for Parents

All in all, most vascular birthmarks are completely benign, and will not lead to any complications or necessitate any treatment. If any of your baby’s marks resemble what has been described here, and you have more questions, speak with your pediatrician about seeing a vascular anomalies specialist. And congratulations on your new baby!

hassenfield
Megan M. Gaffey, MD, is a pediatric otolaryngologist at Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital at NYU Langone. She specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of children with complex ENT issues. She has focused training in vascular malformation management.

Vascular Birthmarks in Babies: What Parents Need to Know Part 1 of 2

 

Vascular birthmark

From the real experts at Hassenfield Children’s Hospital at NYU Langone:

More babies than not are born with some sort of birthmark, and while many fade, some are here to stay. Birthmarks come in all shapes, colors, and sizes. Most of them are fine to leave alone, but there are a few kinds that can become problematic. For parents, it’s important to know which birthmarks are abnormal and should be seen by a physician.

What Are Vascular Birthmarks?

Vascular birthmarks fall under the category of vascular anomalies, which are the result of abnormal blood or lymphatic vessels. They can present anywhere on the body, including the skin, the scalp, on the inside of the mouth, or on the genitalia. They can also be present in internal organs. Depending on the vessel type, vascular birthmarks can vary in color from pink or red, to blue, purple, or gray. Some vascular birthmarks are close enough to the surface of the skin to be seen and/or felt immediately after birth, but others don’t appear until later in infancy or childhood.

What Are the Most Common Vascular Birthmarks?

Infantile hemangiomas and capillary malformations are the most common vascular birthmarks. Both are on the skin’s surface, or typically close enough to the surface to be noticed before a baby is one month old, and tend to be pink, red, or purple.

Infantile Hemangiomas

Infantile hemangiomas are the most common vascular birthmarks. They are commonly called “strawberry angiomas,” because they often look attached to the skin’s surface, and protrude in small, clustered red bumps. Parents tend to say that the marks started as a single, small, red spot right at birth.

Hemangiomas can also be on the flatter side, or located deep to the skin. When deep, they might look like a tinted, smooth protrusion of skin. Shortly after birth, they begin to grow rapidly; during this period, they usually darken and turn from red to purplish.

Infantile hemangiomas grow at their fastest rate when babies are around seven months old. By one year, they begin to shrink. One of the first signs of shrinkage is lightening of the involved skin to gray, which usually begins in the center of the hemangioma. The gray skin is a sign that the blood vessels are being replaced by fatty tissue, which may or may not be noticeable, depending on how big or how deep the infantile hemangioma was.

By age two, infantile hemangiomas usually go away on their own, leaving only a faint mark, if anything. This is why most infantile hemangiomas can be observed as your baby grows, and don’t require any medicine or surgery.

Which Infantile Hemangiomas Need Treatment?

If infantile hemangiomas grow too quickly or get too large, complications can arise. Rapid growth can lead to ulceration, forming cracks in the skin and bleeding. This can lead to infection and scarring.

The size of infantile hemangiomas can also become problematic when they compress or cover surrounding structures. For example, an infantile hemangioma blocking a nostril, or one causing an eyelid to droop and block vision, requires action from your doctor.

Very large infantile hemangiomas can also become aesthetically unappealing, especially if they are located on the face. Even though the birthmark most often goes away on its own, large infantile hemangiomas can leave behind some fatty tissue and distended skin when they fade. This left-behind skin has a pale, saggy appearance. Typically, the larger infantile hemangiomas are allowed to grow, the more saggy tissue they will leave behind.

The birthmark location is also important because it may signify a disorder in the underlying tissues or organs. For example, infantile hemangiomas under or around the chin might indicate that there are infantile hemangiomas in the mucosa of the upper airway, which can lead to breathing problems. If your pediatrician suspects internal organ involvement, your baby may need an airway evaluation by an airway specialist, or an MRI, which is a special imaging study that helps evaluate deep effects of vascular anomalies.

Besides size and location, the number of infantile hemangiomas can also be concerning. In particular, if a patient has more than five separate hemangiomas, that could indicate vascular anomalies of the liver. Make sure to tell your doctor if your baby has multiple infantile hemangiomas, so that imaging tests to check the liver and other internal organs can be ordered, if necessary.

If your baby’s hemangioma is changing and showing some concerning signs, you should see a vascular anomalies specialist—a pediatrician, dermatologist, or surgeon who has spent time dedicated to learning about the spectrum of vascular anomalies, and how to treat them. This specialist will take into account the factors discussed above, and help guide you towards further observation of the infantile hemangioma, or towards a treatment plan. He or she may want you to see a subspecialist, like an otolaryngologist, ophthalmologist, orthopedist, etc, for an opinion about the area potentially affected by the hemangioma.

After evaluating your baby’s infantile hemangioma, your doctor may encourage you to intervene to halt its growth. Treatment options for infantile hemangiomas can be divided into three main groups:

  1. Medical Therapy – Several medications exist that have been shown to help slow or halt hemangioma growth, and in some cases, speed up the regression process.
  2. Laser Therapy – There are advanced medical lasers that can be used to shrink the blood vessels specific to infantile hemangiomas.
  3. Surgical Therapy – Occasionally, removing the hemangioma is the best option. This is usually a decision that is made when it is evident that the hemangioma will cause functional, developmental, or aesthetic problems if left alone

Choosing if and when to perform surgery is a decision that should be made with the help of a vascular anomalies surgeon. It is important to remember that surgery will always leave a scar, no matter when it is performed, so surgery is only chosen if the scar is more favorable than the predicted “scar” left behind by the infantile hemangioma.

hassenfieldMegan M. Gaffey, MD, is a pediatric otolaryngologist at Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital at NYU Langone. She specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of children with complex ENT issues. She has focused training in vascular malformation management.

NYU Langone’s Virtual Urgent Care for Kids Age 12+

Sick Over the Holidays? Get Help Without Leaving Your Couch with NYU Langone’s Virtual Urgent Care

Virtual Urgent CareWhen you’re not feeling well and it isn’t easy to make it to the doctor, what do you do? NYU Langone Health’s Virtual Urgent Care service now offers patients in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania a real-time video visit with a world-class doctor in the palm of the hand.

Saving you a trip to the doctor or even leaving your couch, adults, as well as kids 12 and older can see an NYU Langone board-certified emergency medicine physician for minor medical concerns—right from the comfort of home, on any mobile device.

The service is ideal for non-emergency issues such as cold and flu, sore throat, pink eye, earache, rashes, and urinary tract infection, for both adults and children. Physicians are available for appointments Monday through Friday from 7 am to 11 pm, and on Saturdays and Sundays from 8 am to 8 pm.

These video visits are just like an office appointment. The doctor will review your child’s medical history and symptoms, develop a treatment plan, prescribe any needed medications and, if necessary, provide a referral to a pediatric specialist at Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital at NYU Langone.

For children, parents must schedule the appointment and be present with their child during the visit. They will also need to have proxy access to their child’s NYU Langone Health MyChart account, which can be set up by calling 929-455-6409, or in person, at your child’s doctor’s office. You must be in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, or Pennsylvania to use the Virtual Urgent Care service.

So the next time your child has flu symptoms and doesn’t want to get out of bed to go to the doctor, they don’t have to—NYU Langone Health’s Virtual Urgent Care is here for you when you need it.

Learn More about NYU Langone Health’s Virtual Urgent Care service on Youtube

How to Support Your Child, and Cope with Anxiety During the Holidays

Holidanxiety? 

ANXIETY

The holiday season is often accompanied by stress, which can be particularly difficult for children and adolescents with elevated anxiety. Here are some tips about how parents can help.

  1. Maintain Structure. Late nights, holiday treats, and unscheduled days are what many children love most about the holiday season. At the same time, sufficient sleep, staying active, and a healthy diet set the foundation for adaptive coping. We are all more at-risk of feeling overwhelmed when tired, hungry, or sick! Encourage your child to enjoy the freedoms of their holiday break in moderation. Maintaining a (mostly) consistent bed-time and wake-time (ideally within 1-2 hours of when they need to go to sleep and wake up for school) will ease your child’s transition back to school, and ensure they are well rested during the break. Encouraging your child to eat complete meals, in addition to holiday sweets, provides them with the energy to take full advantage of their free time. Additionally, having a daily routine can help your child know what to expect, and lessen overall anxiety.
  2. Cope ahead. If your child experiences elevated anxiety that causes significant distress, they may benefit from working with a cognitive-behavioral therapist to learn how to identify and effectively cope with anxiety. If your child is already working with a therapist, collaborate with them on ways you can best support your child in generalizing skills learned in therapy to anxiety-provoking situations that arise during the holidays. This may involve developing a cope ahead plan, which includes identifying situations that induce anxiety (e.g., family gatherings, parties, sleepovers, etc.) and selecting coping skills to help your child approach rather than avoid these difficult situations.
  3. The same strategies that apply to supporting your anxious child during the school year also apply during holiday breaks.

    Below are tips on how to CARE for a child with anxiety (Swan, Kagan, Frank, Crawford & Kendall, 2016).

    1. Coping model: Children learn from parents, which means you play a key role in modeling for your child how to manage anxiety effectively. Notice your own reactions to holiday stress, and put the proverbial airplane oxygen mask on yourself first. Being a coping model is not about being ever calm and anxiety-free (good luck!); rather, it is about noticing your own anxiety, and modeling how to skillfully manage. Everyone experiences anxiety, we just don’t want anxiety to keep us from doing what we want or need to do.
    2. Accommodate less. Accommodating anxiety (helping your child avoid situations that cause distress) alleviates anxiety short-term, but maintains anxiety over time. In collaboration with your child’s therapist, work to gradually reduce current accommodations. Try not to anticipate that your child will be anxious and give them an out. Instead, support them in coping with (rather than avoiding) anxiety during the holidays, so that they become more comfortable with practice.
    3. Reinforce brave behavior. Exposures are a key component of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety, and involve children gradually engaging in situations that cause anxiety in the context of a supportive, therapeutic environment. If your child is working with a therapist, collaborate on how they can practice being brave over the break, and provide reinforcement. Without the competing demands of school, the holidays present a golden opportunity for at-home exposure practice! Reinforcement can be social (praise), tangible (stickers, rewards), or activity-driven (extra screen time, picking the family movie). In general, notice and reinforce when your child bravely engages in situations that make them nervous.
    4. Empathize and validate. While we recommend against parents accommodating their child’s anxiety, we also do not want parents to become frustrated or punitive when their child expresses feeling scared, frightened, or nervous. It is completely natural to want to avoid situations that cause anxiety. Telling your child “just do it” or “don’t be nervous” is unlikely to help. Instead, express to your child that you understand how they are feeling, empathize with them, and encourage them to do it anyway. If “it” seems too hard, work together to find one small step your child can take to practice.

The holidays can be stressful for parents and children. Supporting your child by maintaining structure, coping ahead, and reinforcing brave behavior can help!

Anna J. Swan, PhD, is a licensed psychologist and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at NYU Langone Health. She sees patients for evaluations, individual cognitive-behavioral therapy, and group therapy as part of the Anxiety and Mood Disorders Service at the Manhattan and New Jersey locations of the Child Study Center, part of Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital at NYU Langone.