Category Archives: Skills Training

Motivating Children by Developing a Growth Mindset

kumon-growth

By: The Kumon Team

“Motivation is the most important factor in determining whether you succeed in the long run. What I mean by motivation is not only the desire to achieve, but also the love of learning, the love of challenge, and the ability to thrive on obstacles. These are the greatest gifts we can give our students.” – Carol Dweck

Parents often ask how they can help their child become more motivated to learn, especially material that is above grade level. Stanford University Professor of Psychology, Carol Dweck demonstrates that communication to children about their effort, successes, and setbacks often shapes a child’s mindset and motivation.

Here is how it works:

–The author of Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, Dweck postulates that people have either a “fixed mindset” or “growth mindset” that influences our perspective and communication.
–When we believe that success is based on innate ability, we are said to have a fixed theory of intelligence, otherwise known as a fixed mindset.
–When we believe that success is based on hard work, learning, and perseverance, we are said to have a growth theory of intelligence, also called growth mindset.

Parents and Instructors are most effective when they praise effort and results equally. Praising effort means recognizing errors as learning opportunities that lead to improvement and success. The brain is a muscle that becomes stronger through hard work and learning from our mistakes. We can motivate children to develop a growth mindset and achieve their goals through communication about effort, learning, and persistence.

“I’ve got to have a growth mindset, man. That’s what it’s about, me still trying to improve even at 30 and (after) 12 years in the league.” – LeBron James

Interested in Kumon’s programs? Check out all available NYC programs and locations here!

The Harvest of Your Child’s Education

kumon

By: The Kumon Team

With the arrival of October, many families have thoughts of pumpkins, trick-or-treating and Thanksgiving just around the corner. For the colonial founders of America, this time of year was harvest time, or the time for reaping the ripened fruits of their labor from the spring and summer. The same sentiment is still present, especially in the minds of high school seniors as they begin preparing their college applications this autumn. After years of hard work and studying, these students will soon reap their rewards through exceptional SATs scores and early acceptance letters from top universities across the country.

Although your children may be a long way away from applying to colleges, remember the long-term benefits of the Kumon Program. For example, the daily routine of Kumon homework helps remind your children that success is a step by step process and can be achieved by working hard each day. In addition, the confidence that the Kumon Program builds in your children helps encourage them to tackle new challenges, such as joining the debate team or striving to make the honor roll.

The Kumon Program requires diligent practice and commitment by both students and parents to attain academic success.  As Kumon Students, your children will learn to commit to completing Kumon homework on a daily basis, understanding it will help them to achieve their long-term academic goals.

Kumon has convenient locations around New York City. Visit the Kidz Central Station website to find the location nearest to you, and to learn about how the Kumon Program helps children reap a bountiful harvest later in their academic careers.

Interested in Kumon’s programs? Check out all available NYC programs and locations here!

Five Important Standardized Test-Taking Strategies


test_takersBy: The Kumon Staff

There are five basic test-taking strategies that students of any age should have when approaching any exam or assessment. These strategies are applicable to students taking the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium exam in 3rd grade as well as those taking the SAT in high school.

1. Read the instructions carefully. Skipping the instructions can lead to errors. For instance, the directions may say that more than one answer is correct and you must select all answers. Or, the directions may say to select the vocabulary answer that is opposite in meaning.

2. Read each question carefully. After reading the problem carefully and paying attention to the details, underline key words that will help you to understand the question. Seek the information needed and narrow down the important information. Is the question asking for the sum? Does the answer require a synonym?
• Recognize and ignore what is unnecessary. Often math word problems will provide extra information that you don’t need in order to solve the problem.
• If you come across a difficult question, don’t spend all of your time on it. Move on and come back to it at the end.

3. On multiple choice questions, read each answer carefully before making a selection.
• Eliminate all answers that are not correct.
• Don’t fall into the trap of looking for patterns in the answers. There really can be four “B” answers in a row.

4. Select a strategy.
• Often there is more than one way to solve a problem. Chose the strategy that will work best for you. Will you draw a picture? Will you use the regrouping method? Will you use trial and error?
• Don’t second guess yourself by changing your first answers unless you are 100% certain.

5. Use all of your time wisely.
Pay attention to time passing in relation to the time allotment.
• Don’t get distracted by other students in the room.
• If you have time, go back over as many problems as you can to make sure that the answers are correct. When finished, look closely to make sure that you have answered everything and that you haven’t overlooked any questions.

As mentioned above, an important test-taking strategy is the process of carefully examining the directions and exercises, which is routinely practiced by Kumon students. When Kumon students write an incorrect answer, they try the exercise again by carefully reviewing the directions and other given information.

The Great E-Book Debate

The recent New York Times article “Is E-Reading to Your Toddler Story Time or Simply Screen Time?” asked provocative questions about the impact of reading e-books to children under two years old. With the e-book industry growing in leaps and bounds, and more and more titles becoming available all the time, many parents assume that if it’s available on the market it must be good for kids. We owe it to ourselves and especially to our children to consider the possible implications of our practices. Ultimately, we need to ask as a community how e-reading is shaping the experience of young readers.

Boy ReadingThe article captured the crux of the dilemma. On the one hand, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says that children should not have screen time before they’re two. The AAP also says we should read to our children every day. It makes you wonder, do e-books count as “books” or screen time? More importantly, when we read e-books rather than printed books are we nurturing or impeding reading development?

There are no easy answers, as the current research lags behind practice. So it will be years before we begin to articulate impacts on lifelong reading behaviors. A 2013 study of children age three to five at Temple University, however, determined that individuals whose parents read e-books had lower reading comprehension than those who read traditional books. Temple researchers cited “dialogic reading,” or the back and forth text discussion between adult and child, as a factor contributing to reading success. The article also referred to the work of Patricia Kuhl, a director at the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences at the University of Washington, whose research compared language learning in nine-month-old babies when taught by adults vs. DVDs. The DVDs had no impact on learning, while the teachers made lasting impacts.

Where does all this quasi-information leave us as parents and educators? We need to ask ourselves, what am I really teaching when I read to a child, in particular a child under two? Am I mindfully pulling together the building blocks of reading comprehension? Only partially. As a mother of three boys now 12, 13, and 15, and an early childhood educator, my reading goals were twofold: to pass on a lust for literature and develop a loving relationship between us.

There’s no better way than reading to your child to give them a varied and colorful vocabulary, a deep interest in story and ideas, and to build empathy with characters and people. And this covers reading no matter what the medium. If you want a curious child you need to model curiosity yourself and what better way than through sharing a text? The close physical bond of cuddling together over a book (or e-book) sets the groundwork for deep affection. Set aside the guilt. Am I reading enough? Am I reading the right books? And now, am I reading with the right tool? Sharing the wonder is sharing the wonder. Intellectual companionship begins at birth, a child and an adult learning side by side and enjoying the marvels of the world together. Let’s give the research more time to unfold before we start beating ourselves up as we enjoy (e)reading to our kids.

Get Your Toddler Reading!

Get Your Toddler Reading!

Toddlers can be voracious readers. They are also delightful reading companions as they are just starting to request favorites, remember rhymes and even catch your skipped words. Toddlers are interactive partners and when you read together you will get to know your child better and make wonderful memories.

Boy Reading

While our toddlers may be small, don’t forget that they are very capable little people. Here are some things that toddler “readers” can do:

Know How to Look Like A Reader: Toddlers are keen observers of your behavior, including what you do when you read. They know how to hold a book, turn pages, and place it facing upright. They’ll pretend to read to you, and even read to their stuffed animals. Book knowledge starts very young.

Have Opinions: As in all aspects of life, toddlers can have strong opinions about books. Whether it is Curious George, train books or silly rhymes, they will give you cues about what they enjoy. Many toddlers will hook into a book and want you to read it over and over again. This is a great sign, as they actively seek out interests and become agents in their own learning. Honor their requests even after the fiftieth read—you’ll validate and cultivate a lifelong learner.

Learn To Notice: Toddlers can point out details that catch their attention. Whether through gesture or words, they can select one thing from another. These skills of perception are crucial for later learning when they’ll need to zero in visually in math, science or reading. Additionally, if you notice what they notice, you provoke conversation. “Oh, I see the red bird too.” When you listen, observe and respond to your child you are a great teacher.

Great books to hold visual interest include:

Mother Mother I Feel Sick, Send for the Doctor Quick Quick Quick by Remy Charlip
Zoom by Istvan Banyai
Can You See What I See by Walter Wick

Name Things—Toddlers are busy naming things. From simple to complex, children zero in on animals, foods, trucks, etc. Concept books—ABCs, numbers, colors—are perfect for stimulating a toddler’s fascination with naming because the single clear images encourage naming.

Check out some of these books:

Over Under and Through by Tana Hoban (and all of her books)
Growing Colors by Bruce McMillan
Zoo-ology by Joelle Jolivet

Begin to Remember Sequence—Toddlers can start to appreciate books with a beginning, middle and end. In the story of The Three Bears, for example, they might remember the incidents with chairs, beds and porridge and anticipate what’s coming next. Sequencing is a crucial skill for later school learning and one that you should encourage. Offer stories that have memorable and predictable sequences to foster this type of learning.
Books that have clear sequences include:

The Gingerbread Boy, The Three Billy Goats Gruff, The Three Bears and The Three Little Pigs all by Paul Galdone
The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton
Brown Bear, Brown Bear What Do You See by Eric Carle

As your child’s language skills grow, their relationship to literature changes. They understand more and can begin to have empathy with characters that get lost and found, make friends, are scared and exhibit joy. As you get caught up in feelings together you will share one of the most profound early childhood experiences. Treasure the time now, as children grow quickly and soon enough you will long for these treasured snuggly hours reading together.

Renee Bock is a dedicated early childhood educator, who is currently the Educational Director at Explore + Discover, a social learning center in Manhattan. Renee has more than a decade of experience in the field and holds a Master’s in Early Childhood Education from Bank Street College in New York. In her present position, she is helping Explore+Discover open the first of over twenty New York City centers focused on children from 3 months to two years old. She can be reached at [email protected]. Picture above via Rivka Singer.

 

Meet Jason Sagebiel, Founder of Sage Music

KCS: So Jason – tell us how you got into music and started Sage Music

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JS: I got into teaching through the military.  After sustaining a brain injury in 2003 in Iraq I was having difficulties and went to speech therapy.  It was helpful, but not with complicated tasks – so I went into learning music and techniques to aide my own recovery. I now apply the same principles for teaching and learning for students as well.

JS: I was teaching privately since 1996,  but I’ve had so much referral business that I couldn’t take them all on anymore. I got a small studio in Forest Hills and it’s just grown from there. We moved to LIC three years ago, and Greenpoint in the last couple months.

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KCS: It’s great to see you so successful and bringing such enjoyment and education to children’s lives. What age do you think is best to get them started?

JS: That depends on your goals. Instruments such as the guitar and violin take two hands to make one sound, so those are great for around ages 6-7. Piano and drums take less coordination only requiring one hand to make one sound, so you can start them as early as ages 4-5.

piano

JS: Of course, it’s still great to get kids exposed to music at an earlier age. We offer classes for ages 5 and under that are fun and engaging and about exposure, not training.  They come to learn about music as well as a little singing using movement and rhythm. We also have a mom and me class for babies under 2 years of age. You can see them all on KidzCentralStation.com!

JS: There is a progression and I encourage parents to do the exposure classes for toddlers to see what their children prefer – kids don’t always know what they will like. So if they are exposed, they will see if they really love music or not.

KCS: Music really is great for kids. My toddler loves to scream and “dance” when music is playing. Even if a car drives by playing it, he will dance in his stroller. I agree it’s incredibly helpful and engaging. Can you share a great story with us about how it has impacted a student of your own?

JS: I had one student who was badly hurt many years ago, and he’s had trouble getting a job and/or even holding a job because of the injuries and demeanor. However playing music has given him a real sense of purpose. He’s found a home and something meaningful to do.  It’s inspiring to see others as empowered by music as I have been.

KCS: That’s a beautiful story! Is there a certain instrument that students resonate with over others?

JS: Well, we have this new class where we introduce multiple instruments.  Each week we show them a new instrument, and I am fascinated how excited they get over almost all of them! I thought they wouldn’t like this one, and love this one, but it’s exciting to see how kids in general respond to music and instruments.

JS: Most students stick through the programs for many many years.

KCS: Well I have to say we’re pretty excited ourselves to come and check out a class! Can you give us a little more info about Sage Music?

JS: We’re different than most schools – we have a mature atmosphere. Adults also take classes, or we have parents and children taking classes together. Fathers and sons  can take guitar lessons together and it’s really cute. We encourage that.  We also offer group classes for adults and weekly group practice sessions, as well as recitals. Sometimes we do private recitals, and then open to larger crowds too.

music

JS: We also offer performance opportunities outside in the public, such as concerts on the waterfront in LIC (Gentry Plaza Park). It’s usually as the sun is setting on Manhattan – it’s a really magical experience. You can learn more about the concert series here on LICconcerts.com.  We are planning one concert this year to be a kids day – with children performers, and children’s entertainment.  The schedule will be posted soon.

KCS: That sounds AMAZING! We’ll be sure to come check them out. Any other events?

JS: May 17th is the LIC Arts Open – http://licartsopen.org/ This is the free arts festival in LIC, which is running at the same time as LIC Springs – http://www.licpartnership.org/events/lic-springs – The free community block party, where we will be running the stage. Be sure to stop by and say hello!

 

Sage Music School focuses on teaching the skills that enable your children to play music with confidence and ease. The school’s educational core encompasses proper instrument mechanics, proper body usage, as well as the best methods for learning and practicing so that your kids will get the most from their lessons. The school offers private lessons and classes in guitar, piano, voice, violin, cello, clarinet, saxophone, flute, trumpet, drums, composition, theory, and more. In addition to traditional music instruction for children and adults, the school offers special music programs for students 0-6 years of age. Register for music classes, private music lessons, or contact Sage Music school.

Jason Sagebiel, an MTNA Nationally Certified Teacher of Music, is the owner of Sage Music school. He is a music educator, guitarist, composer, and the director of the NYC Guitar Orchestra. He has performed in major concert halls and on the radio. Sagebiel is the subject of two books on music, in addition to being on the music faculty of the City University of New York.

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Is My Child Ready for Flute Lessons?

Your child loves music, you’ve tried piano lessons and you bought that plastic recorder, but the interest seems to be fading and the musical community and fun you hoped for is nonexistent –now what?

Playing the Flute – What Age is Best?

A child as young as three can start the violin, so why not the flute? The answer is complex, and I do have colleagues that begin students as young as three, but I think five or six is a perfect starting age for flute lessons.  A youngster at this age will respond very well to the mix of familiar pattern and open-ended creativity to be found in learning to play the flute. They will be able to focus for short bursts of time.  And of course, the benefits of music and instrumental instruction to the developing brain are well documented — click here for more: 6 Benefits of Music Lessons

What kind of flute?

Jupiter Prodigy Flute – ideal for very small children

Jupiter Prodigy Flute

Trevor James 10x flute comes with both curved and straight head joints

10x flute curved-resized

A young flutist can usually handle a “real” instrument –that is, one with a curved-head joint that fits the child’s hands and body.  There are several flutes on the market geared towards young children. Although there are instruments available with only a body and head-joint (such as the Jupiter Prodigy pictured above), I recommend getting a complete flute (such as the Trevor James or similar), as it can be played for many years without need for a step-up or replacement instrument.

Posture, breathing and hand position.

A young flutist learns a series of movements not unlike a little dance –we stand, smile, bow, adjust our feet, and float the flute above our heads before even playing a note. Performing this ritual before each song instills a sense of calm, steady relaxation and sets up the child in an attitude of openness and readiness to play.

boy playing the flute

Developing the practice habit.

Parents, you must take up the gauntlet here! It is a rare child who will set their own schedule and find time for regular practice sessions.  Just as you set up play dates, dinner time and transportation to school, it is your responsibility to create a little space for music in your busy family life.  That could mean having books, stand, instrument, etc. set up in a corner of the living room, and making sure there is time during day for practice. You can listen to your child play their songs and count their repetitions, or ask them to explain a new concept that only they understand. Or you could do a flute set-up with them –  keep an eye on their pinky to make sure it’s going to the right place.  A partnership is needed here – practice time only takes about 15-20 minutes a day, and will add incalculable benefit to your child’s musical life. And when grandparents come to town imagine their delight when they get hear a new piece!

Group classes Available Through KidzCentralStation.com:

Flute lessons at NYC Flute provide a built in community of peers –there’s always someone to look up to, and someone to show off for in group class! During private lesson the young flutist learns one-on-one according to their own particular strengths and needs, but in group class a whole new set of music-making skills come into focus that can’t be duplicated in any other way: Listening, ensemble skills, performance confidence –and getting to play with your friends, what could be more fun?

Book a class today on KidzCentralStation.com, here!

 

Meet Kate Tempesta of Urban Golf Academy

golf

Kate Tempesta’s Urban Golf Academy is a unique program that introduces children to the game of golf as early as age three. Their proprietary techniques get children not just interested in the game, but also engaged for years to come. You can follow Kate on Facebook and Twitter.

KCS: So Kate, tell us how you got into golf? Did you love it as a kid yourself? 

KT: Actually I didn’t really like playing golf growing up – I had 5 uncles who were all avid golfers, but I was bored by it. I played other sports like basketball and soccer because I wanted to run!

I was living in NYC for 8 years when I finally took it up. A friend of mine was a devoted golfer and invited me to come play one weekend just before my 30th birthday. I immediately fell in love with it. I never looked back – I started playing seriously. It gave me a sense of being an athlete again. It allowed me to enjoy being outside and in the country, as well as the perseverance and the social aspect. It tapped into my creativity.  I saw it in a completely different light than I did when I was a kid.

KCS: How did you know it was the right sport to be teaching children?

KT: I’ll never forget the first time I was on the course; I actually thought to myself it would be a great sport for children! I started to compete as an amateur since I had summers off as a teacher, and then I was encouraged to become an instructor through the LGPA. I started teaching at Montauk Downs in the summer of 2007. I had studied sports medicine and so I thought that my segue into golf would be to specialize in golf fitness. I soon realized “What am I doing? I have kids right here and no one wants to teach these young children!” I was already teaching creative movement in a preschool on the UES, and golf IS creative movement. I knew it would be great for young children to be playful at that age, to be creative and engaged. You can teach children anything, and golf was empowering to me – I wanted it to be empowering to children.

KCS: I love that you immediately knew you should be teaching and incorporating the creative movement into golf for kids. How did parents perceive the idea when you first approached them?

KT: I asked the director of my preschool to start an afterschool golf program, and when we asked UES parents – of course they loved that we would teach the children golf! Many of the parents were already players themselves. Plus, the children already loved the creative movement classes.

KCS: So how did you go from after school classes to Kate Tempesta’s Urban Golf Academy?

KT: I was teaching for two years on Mondays and Wednesdays, but then the kids graduated and went to kindergarten. However, they wanted to stay in the program, so I had to find a way to expand into new classes. I continued to run the program in the school, but took on the alumnae at Central Park. Also, now it was outside, instead the classroom!

Then I met my business partner Mari as I was teaching her two girls. We sat down for coffee and she said she wanted to help reach more children. She is the one who saw the beauty of the program and where it could go. I wanted to grow into other schools, but not like her – she saw the big picture. And thus, Kate Tempesta’s Urban Golf Academy was created!

KCS: That’s great! As a golfer myself, I like to see that golf is making a comeback with children.

KT: It’s definitely making a comeback with children. Since Mari and I met in 2010 and officially started UGA we are in between 15 and 20 after school programs seasonally and also offer approximately 25 classes a week in NYC Parks come spring (that you can sign up for right here on Kidz Central Station!) We also rent indoor spaces during winter months.

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KCS: Yes, you can now sign up for spring classes right here! What ages do you offer?

KT: We start with age 3, and are expanding levels for 4-5 year olds now too. For children 10-12 years old, we even use a bus service to go to local golf courses.

Now the kids can progress through the levels. I do this for the children – its growing the child and giving them a whole program that’s creative and fun using early childhood skills.

KCS: So you believe golf is a great way for children to learn new skills for life, not just a fun sport?

KT: Golf is absolutely a great way to learn and start life skills in addition to being a fun, lifelong sport.. At UGA our focus is fun, while teaching the fundamentals of golf in child-friendly speak. We care about safe, silly, and successful. As children progress with our program and they advance developmentally, we become more technical, when they are ready. All along they are learning golf.

The class with the 3 year-olds is really an introduction – lots of listening skills, sports skills like throwing and catching a ball. Obstacle courses. Building an athletic foundation.

Parents get it, and trust that I will build a progressive program that will engage these learners through golf. We coach human beings that happen to be learning through golf. We use a whole child approach and make learning fun, setting the stage for their love of learning for a lifetime. 

Book your kids next golf class here on Kidz Central Station!

Top 5 Indoor Sports to Get Through Winter

Super Bowl fever came and dominated NYC last week, and got us in the mood to get out and get active. Or maybe it’s all this snow that cooping us up in the house? All of us want to just get out and burn some energy! Thankfully we live in NYC and there is no shortage of indoor sports to keep us active.

Top 5 Indoor Sports to Get Through Winter

1. Getting Spring Fever and ready for Baseball season?

indoor sports

Don’t fear! NY Empire Baseball can have you running around the bases today! Hosted at PS 811 on the Upper West Side, classes range from 4 years up to 14. Dig out your baseball glove and hat from storage and head up to catch some fly balls!

2. Missing the pools? Swimming Class is just for you!

indoor sports

Just because there’s snow on the ground doesn’t mean you can’t slip on that bathing suit! Physique Swimming offers TONS of classes! You can get baby ready for the beach as young as 6 months – and guess what – parents get in the water, too!  Learn more and book a class here.  Summer will be here before we know it!

3. Want to try something to ban the seasonal stress? Try Yoga!

indoor sports

We know there are lots of Yoga lovers out there, so don’t let having a baby hold you back! Karma Kids at Kids at Work in Chelsea offers mommy and me yoga classes – the perfect cabin fever escape! Strap on baby and walk over to Chelsea to help relieve some of the pent-up stress and frustrations from being cooped in. Nothing is better for the soul, or baby, that a little relaxation for all! Sign u for the Karma Kidz at Kidz at Work Yoga class here! 

4. Does Your Little One Like to Kick Things? Soccer Class is the Answer!

indoor sports

If your toddler is running out of things to do in your tiny apartment and has resorted to drop kicking your cell phone across the room, maybe it’s time to join us for a soccer class! Not only do they learn foot skills, they learn listening skills and how to follow directions. Plus, is there any way better to burn some of that energy? We love Soc Roc – see a full schedule of available classes here. 

5. Looking to Try Something New? How About Martial Arts?

indoor sports

We do live in NYC, so why not add some self-defense moves and techniques to your little ones agenda? Taekwon-Do offers many physical benefits, as well as improving concentration skills. It’s also good for teaching discipline and respect –  by focusing on these virtues, Taekwon-Do develops self-esteem, kindness, confidence and spirit in students. Book a class with Yang Taekwon-Do today!

Kidz Central Station’s New Winter Classes in NYC for Kids

Living in NYC means you have access to non stop activities and events – even for the kids. There might be a ton of snow on the ground this Winter, but that doesn’t mean you have to stay cooped up in your apartment! Take advantage of the cold weather by exploring some of the top winter classes for kids in NYC – here are some of our favorites:

Top Winter Classes in NYC for Kids

Drama Llama

classes in nyc

Where else in the world can you get acting classes for kids – taught by professional Broadway actors?? Students create, rehearse, and perform their very own original script. A final performance is offered for family and friends on the last day of class. Drama Llama has a weekend class starting on 2/15 for ages 6-12. Sign up here!

Soc Roc Soccer

classes in nyc

Speaking of professional teachers, this soccer class for toddlers is taught by former professional soccer players. Classes start for kids as young as 18 months, meaning your newly walking toddler can add soccer foot skills to their newly acquired talents! Classes are going on now all over NYC, so pop in for a free trial, and prorate for the semester! Sign up here.

Cooking at Whole Foods with Creative Kitchen

classes in nyc

There’s no better way to beat the cold than in a hot kitchen! Your little chef can learn about colors, numbers and shapes, and then eat them too! Parents will be just as excited when they see how many new fruits and vegetables their kids will adopt into their routine diets! kids having fun and learning good nutritional habits is a win win!

Fun with Food starts 2/3 with drop-in or semester options available. Click here to learn more!

14th Street Y Language Workshops

classes in nyc

Kids as young as 6 months can starts to learn French,  Chinese or Spanish. And don’t forget parents, you might learn a word or two as well! Every week babies and toddlers can learn about a different culture through singing and percussion jam sessions. It’s all in Spanish, but no Spanish is required! Learn more about the 14th Street Y classes here. 

Or maybe you want to try Russian? Check out the JCC of Manhattan for it’s fifth year of the Russian Shabbat program! For kids ages 3-4. Learn more here. 

S2KIDS Leadership and Social Skills

classes in nyc

This is a  9-week class that teaches leadership and social skills – including eye contact, joining a group, problem solving, empathy and conflict resolution among others. Classes start in Tribeca on 2/15 on weekends. Learn more here. 

Kidz Central Station offers many different classes for any type of indoor activity that gets you out of the house this winter. Click here to view a full list of all available classes, and book one today!